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The Classic | Porsche 911 | Daddys-Carparts

The Porsche 911 was developed as a more powerful, larger, more comfortable replacement for the Porsche 356, the company's first model. The new car made its public debut at the 1963 Frankfurt Motor Show (German: Internationale Automobil-Ausstellung).

The car was developed with the proof-of-concept twin-fan Type 745 engine, and the car presented at the auto show had a non-operational mockup of the production single-fan 901 engine, receiving a working one in February 1964. It originally was designated as the "Porsche 901" (901 being its internal project number). 82 cars were built as 901s. However, Peugeot protested on the grounds that in France it had exclusive rights to car names formed by three numbers with a zero in the middle. So, instead of selling the new model with another name in France, Porsche changed the name to 911. The first 911s reached the US in February 1965.

The styling was largely by Ferdinand "Butzi" Porsche. Erwin Komenda, the leader of the Porsche car body construction department, initially objected but later was also involved in the design.

The 356 came to the end of its production life in 1965, but there was still a market for a 4-cylinder car, particularly in the USA. The Porsche 912, introduced the same year, served as a direct replacement, offering the de-tuned version of 356 SC's 4-cylinder. In 1966, Porsche introduced the more powerful 911S with Type 901/02 engine. In Aug. 1967, the A series went into production .The Targa (meaning "plate" in Italian version was introduced. The road going Targa was equipped with a removable roof panel and a removable plastic rear window (although a fixed glass version was offered from 1968). More models from the 911 were named 911T, 911L, 911R.

The B series went into production in Aug. 1968 that replaced the 911L model with 911E with fuel injection, and remained in production until July 1969. The C series was introduced in Aug. 1969 with enlarged 2.2 L engine. Fuel injection arrived for the 911S (901/10 engine) and for a new middle model, 911E (901/09 engine). The D series was produced from Aug. 1970 to July 1971, the E series for 1972–1973 model years (Aug. 1971 to July 1972 production) consisted of the same models, but with a new, larger engine. This is universally known as the "2.4 L" engine, despite its displacement being closer to 2.3 litres. The E series had the unusual oil filler behind the right side door. The F series (Aug. 1972 to July 1973 production) moved the oil tank back to the original behind-the-wheel location. This change was in response to complaints that gas-station attendants often filled gasoline into the oil tank.


 This article is based on the article Porsche 911 from the free encyclopedia Wikipedia and is double licensed under GNU-Lizenz Free Documation License and Creative Commons CC-BY-SA 3.0 Unported. In the Wikipedia is a list of the authors available.

The Porsche 911 was developed as a more powerful, larger, more comfortable replacement for the Porsche 356, the company's first model. The new car made its public debut at the 1963 Frankfurt Motor... read more »
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The Classic | Porsche 911 | Daddys-Carparts

The Porsche 911 was developed as a more powerful, larger, more comfortable replacement for the Porsche 356, the company's first model. The new car made its public debut at the 1963 Frankfurt Motor Show (German: Internationale Automobil-Ausstellung).

The car was developed with the proof-of-concept twin-fan Type 745 engine, and the car presented at the auto show had a non-operational mockup of the production single-fan 901 engine, receiving a working one in February 1964. It originally was designated as the "Porsche 901" (901 being its internal project number). 82 cars were built as 901s. However, Peugeot protested on the grounds that in France it had exclusive rights to car names formed by three numbers with a zero in the middle. So, instead of selling the new model with another name in France, Porsche changed the name to 911. The first 911s reached the US in February 1965.

The styling was largely by Ferdinand "Butzi" Porsche. Erwin Komenda, the leader of the Porsche car body construction department, initially objected but later was also involved in the design.

The 356 came to the end of its production life in 1965, but there was still a market for a 4-cylinder car, particularly in the USA. The Porsche 912, introduced the same year, served as a direct replacement, offering the de-tuned version of 356 SC's 4-cylinder. In 1966, Porsche introduced the more powerful 911S with Type 901/02 engine. In Aug. 1967, the A series went into production .The Targa (meaning "plate" in Italian version was introduced. The road going Targa was equipped with a removable roof panel and a removable plastic rear window (although a fixed glass version was offered from 1968). More models from the 911 were named 911T, 911L, 911R.

The B series went into production in Aug. 1968 that replaced the 911L model with 911E with fuel injection, and remained in production until July 1969. The C series was introduced in Aug. 1969 with enlarged 2.2 L engine. Fuel injection arrived for the 911S (901/10 engine) and for a new middle model, 911E (901/09 engine). The D series was produced from Aug. 1970 to July 1971, the E series for 1972–1973 model years (Aug. 1971 to July 1972 production) consisted of the same models, but with a new, larger engine. This is universally known as the "2.4 L" engine, despite its displacement being closer to 2.3 litres. The E series had the unusual oil filler behind the right side door. The F series (Aug. 1972 to July 1973 production) moved the oil tank back to the original behind-the-wheel location. This change was in response to complaints that gas-station attendants often filled gasoline into the oil tank.


 This article is based on the article Porsche 911 from the free encyclopedia Wikipedia and is double licensed under GNU-Lizenz Free Documation License and Creative Commons CC-BY-SA 3.0 Unported. In the Wikipedia is a list of the authors available.

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