Close filters
from to

Design Evolution | Porsche 914 | Daddys-Carparts

Design evolution[edit] Volkswagen versions originally featured an 80 PS (59 kW; 79 bhp) fuel-injected 1.7 L flat-4 engine based on the Volkswagen air-cooled engine. Porsche's 914/6 variant featured a carbureted 110 PS (81 kW; 108 bhp) 2.0 L flat-6 engine from the 1969 911T, placed amidships in front of a version of the 1969 911's "901" gearbox configured for a mid-engine car.

Karmann manufactured the rolling chassis at their plant, completing Volkswagen production in-house or delivering versions to Porsche for their final assembly. 914/6 models used lower gear ratios and high brake gearing in order to try to overcome the greater weight of the 6 cylinder engine along with higher power output. Suspension, brakes, and handling were otherwise the same.

A Volkswagen-Porsche joint venture, Volkswagen of America, handled export to the U.S., where both versions were badged and sold as Porsches, except in California, where they were sold in Volkswagen dealerships. The four-cylinder cars were sold as Volkswagen-Porsches at European Volkswagen dealerships.


 

This article is based on the article Porsche 914 from the free encyclopedia Wikipedia and is double licensed under GNU-Lizenz Free Documation License and Creative Commons CC-BY-SA 3.0 Unported. In the Wikipedia is a list of the authors available.

Design evolution[edit] Volkswagen versions originally featured an 80 PS (59 kW; 79 bhp) fuel-injected 1.7 L flat-4 engine based on the Volkswagen air-cooled engine. Porsche's 914/6 variant... read more »
Close window
Design Evolution | Porsche 914 | Daddys-Carparts

Design evolution[edit] Volkswagen versions originally featured an 80 PS (59 kW; 79 bhp) fuel-injected 1.7 L flat-4 engine based on the Volkswagen air-cooled engine. Porsche's 914/6 variant featured a carbureted 110 PS (81 kW; 108 bhp) 2.0 L flat-6 engine from the 1969 911T, placed amidships in front of a version of the 1969 911's "901" gearbox configured for a mid-engine car.

Karmann manufactured the rolling chassis at their plant, completing Volkswagen production in-house or delivering versions to Porsche for their final assembly. 914/6 models used lower gear ratios and high brake gearing in order to try to overcome the greater weight of the 6 cylinder engine along with higher power output. Suspension, brakes, and handling were otherwise the same.

A Volkswagen-Porsche joint venture, Volkswagen of America, handled export to the U.S., where both versions were badged and sold as Porsches, except in California, where they were sold in Volkswagen dealerships. The four-cylinder cars were sold as Volkswagen-Porsches at European Volkswagen dealerships.


 

This article is based on the article Porsche 914 from the free encyclopedia Wikipedia and is double licensed under GNU-Lizenz Free Documation License and Creative Commons CC-BY-SA 3.0 Unported. In the Wikipedia is a list of the authors available.

Viewed